Close Menu
Home > Results > U.S. v. E-5, United States Army

U.S. v. E-5, United States Army

October 15, 2018

Fort Benning, Georgia

The SGT, a 27D JAG Paralegal in the 75th Ranger Regiment, is accused of distributing cocaine to numerous other Rangers within the regiment, introducing cocaine onto a Federal installation, attempting to distribute cocaine, and unlawfully storing a personally owned weapon in his vehicle. Even after the SGT’s ETS date had passed, the Government keeps SGT in the Army past his ETS date and prefers charges against him. SGT retains Mr. Mickey Williams to represent him. Mr. Williams begins investigating the case and contacting various witnesses. It becomes clear that the Government’s case heavily relies on the credibility of one witness, another Ranger. This witness had previously been punished for using cocaine. At the Article 32 Preliminary Hearing, the Government calls this witness to testify that he purchased cocaine from the client. Mr. Williams aggressively cross-examines this supposed “snitch”. During William’s aggressive and lengthy cross-examination, the “snitch” gives in, and finally admits to Williams in this open hearing that he originally told another Ranger that he got the cocaine from someone else at the party, not from the client. Williams pushes even farther, forcing the “snitch” to admit that he would absolutely lie to law enforcement before he would lie to another Ranger. Williams highlighted the “snitch’s” lack of credibility and inconsistencies during his closing argument at the end of the Article 32 hearing. Williams also hammers home how the Government failed to meet its burden of proof, and how the Government’s entire case relied on this “snitch,” an admitted liar.

Case Result

Two days after the Article 32 Preliminary Hearing, the Government WITHDRAWS its Charges and DISMISSES THE CASE. NO Involuntary Separation, NO Federal Conviction. Client is allowed to head home after his ETS date with an Honorable Discharge and FULL MILITARY BENEFITS.

Share This Page:
Facebook Twitter LinkedIn
protected by reCAPTCHA Privacy - Terms